Sydney Opera House designed by architect Jørn Utzon.

The Sydney Opera House The Australian Ballet and The Sydney Symphony Orchestra Stan Lee Super humans seen from the north

The Sydney Opera House is a multi-venue performing arts centre at Sydney Harbour in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It is one of the 20th century’s most famous and distinctive buildings.

Designed by Danish architect Jørn Utzon, but completed by an Australian architectural team headed up by Peter Hall, the building was formally opened on 20 October 1973 after a gestation beginning with Utzon’s 1957 selection as winner of an international design competition. The Government of New South Wales, led by the premier, Joseph Cahill, authorised work to begin in 1958 with Utzon directing construction. The government’s decision to build Utzon’s design is often overshadowed by circumstances that followed, including cost and scheduling overruns as well as the architect’s ultimate resignation.

The building and its surrounds occupy the whole of Bennelong Point on Sydney Harbour, between Sydney Cove and Farm Cove, adjacent to the Sydney central business district and the Royal Botanic Gardens, and close by the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

The building comprises multiple performance venues, which together host well over 1,500 performances annually, attended by more than 1.2 million people. Performances are presented by numerous performing artists, including three resident companies: Opera Australia, the Sydney Theatre Company and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. As one of the most popular visitor attractions in Australia, the site is visited by more than eight million people annually, and approximately 350,000 visitors take a guided tour of the building each year. The building is managed by the Sydney Opera House Trust, an agency of the New South Wales State Government.

On 28 June 2007, the Sydney Opera House became a UNESCO World Heritage Site, having been listed on the (now defunct) Register of the National Estate since 1980, the National Trust of Australia register since 1983, the City of Sydney Heritage Inventory since 2000, the New South Wales State Heritage Register since 2003, and the Australian National Heritage List since 2005.

Five Sydney sites you may have seen in films on Netflix: 1. Colonial State Bank: ” The Matrix “, 2. Martin Place “Superman Returns”, 3. Bare Island “Mission Impossible 2 “, 4. Fox Studios ” Star Wars Attack of the Clones ” and ” Star Wars Revenge of the Sith “, 5. Strickland House ” Australia “

RTV – Live Show – Ne Se Hecat

We live times where Super Heroes and Super Humans do not only exist in science fiction Literature or in Stan Lee’s comic world or in Hollywood films.
Due to the increasing networking of the world and the entry of recent communication media such as Twitter, Facebook or Google, more and more people with extraordinary abilities are discovered.
Well-known TV calibers and channels like Discovery Channel or National Geographic, bring these people in the focus of the media and report full length astonishing, occasionally overwhelming individual destinies.
As fascinated as viewers of these programs, are scientists and physicians.
They hope for new approaches to research of previously non-explainable phenomena, as well as harnessing the skills of these people for the development of new technologies.
I thank RTV Slovenia and the entire production team of Ne Se Hecat, for the opportunity to show my performance live in your show.