The Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow Russia.

The Bolshoi Theatre Большо́й теа́тр in Mocow Russia

The Bolshoi Theatre – Большой театр – in Moscow Russia. The Moscow’s Bolshoi Ballet Academy.

In 1776 Catherine II granted Prince Peter Ouroussoff a licence to organise theatrical performances, balls and other forms of entertainment. Ouroussoff set up the theatre in collaboration with English tightrope walker Michael Maddox. Initially, it held performances in a private home, but it acquired the Petrovka Theatre and on 30 December 1780, it began producing plays and operas, thus establishing what would become the Bolshoi Theatre. Fire destroyed the Petrovka Theatre on 8 October 1805, and the New Arbat Imperial Theatre replaced it on 13 April 1808, however it also succumbed to fire during the French invasion of Moscow in 1812.

The first instance of the theatre was built between 1821 and 1824, designed and supervised to completion by architect Joseph Bové based upon an initial competition-winning design created by Petersburg-based Russian architect Andrei Mikhailov that was deemed too costly to complete. Bové also concurrently designed the nearby Maly Theatre and the surrounding Theater Square, The new building opened on 18 January 1825 as the Bolshoi Petrovsky Theatre with a performance of Fernando Sor’s ballet, Cendrillon. Initially, it presented only Russian works, but foreign composers entered the repertoire around 1840.

The Bolshoi has been the site of many historic premieres, including: Tchaikovsky’s The Voyevoda and Mazeppa, Modest Mussorgsky’s one version of Boris Godunov was given on 16 December 1888, Rachmaninoff’s Aleko and Francesca da Rimini, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera The Maid of Pskov, with Feodor Chaliapin singing the role of Ivan the Terrible, Dmitri Shostakovich’s opera Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District in 1935.

The first symphonic concert by the Bolshoi Orchestra took place at the Bolshoi Theatre on 4 May 1919, conducted by Serge Koussevitzky, Leonid Sobinov, Antonina Nezhdanova, Ksenia Dzerzhinskaya, Galina Vishnevskaya, and dozens of other outstanding opera singers have performed at the Bolshoi.

The Bolshoi Ballet remains one of the world’s foremost ballet companies, in addition to being one of the largest, with approximately 220 dancers. In 2000, the Bolshoi Ballet opened its first Ballet Academy outside Russia, in Joinville, Brazil.

The National Theatre Munich Germany. München Nationaltheater.

The National Theatre Munich Germany München Nationaltheater is a historic opera house home of the Bavarian State Opera Bavarian State Orchestra and the Bavarian State Ballet

The National Theatre Munich Germany München Nationaltheater is a historic opera house home of the Bavarian State Opera Bavarian State Orchestra and the Bavarian State Ballet WordPress

The National Theatre Munich Germany. München Nationaltheater is a historic opera house home of the Bavarian State Opera, Bavarian State Orchestra and the Bavarian State Ballet.

History:

The first theatre was commissioned in 1810 by King Maximilian I of Bavaria because the nearby Cuvilliés Theatre had too little space. It was designed by Karl von Fischer, with the 1782 Odéon in Paris as architectural precedent. Construction began on 26 October 1811 but was interrupted in 1813 by financing problems. In 1817 a fire occurred in the unfinished building.

The new theatre finally opened on 12 October 1818 with a performance of Die Weihe by Ferdinand Fränzl, but was soon destroyed by another fire on 14 January 1823 the stage décor caught fire during a performance of Die beyden Füchse by Étienne Méhul and the fire could not be put out because the water supply was frozen. Coincidentally the Paris Odéon itself burnt down in 1818.

Second theatre – 1825 to 1943
Designed by Leo von Klenze, the second theatre incorporated Neo-Grec features in its portico and triangular pediment and an entrance supported by Corinthian columns. In 1925 it was modified to create an enlarged stage area with updated equipment. The building was gutted in an air raid on the night of 3 October 1943.

Third theatre – 1963 to present
The third and present theatre (1963) recreates Karl von Fischer’s original neo-classical design, though on a slightly larger, 2,100-seat scale. The magnificent royal box is the centre of the interior rondel, decorated with two large caryatids. The new stage covers 2,500 square metres (3,000 sq yd), and is thus the world’s third largest, after the Opéra Bastille in Paris and the Grand Theatre Warsaw.

Through the consistent use of wood as a building material, the auditorium has excellent acoustics. Architect Gerhard Moritz Graubner closely preserved the original look of the foyer and main staircase. It opened on 21 November 1963 with an invitation-only performance of Die Frau ohne Schatten under the baton of Joseph Keilberth. Two nights later came the first public performance, of Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, again under Keilberth.