Prof. Dierk Schroeder and Superhuman Magnetic Man Magola discuss Isaac Newton’s universal law of gravitation.

Prof. dr. Dierk Schröder and Superhuman Magnetic Man Miroslaw Magola discuss Isaac newton's universal law of gravitation

Prof. Dierk Schroeder and Superhuman Magnetic Man Miroslaw Magola discuss Isaac Newton’s universal law of gravitation.

Newton’s law of universal gravitation states that every particle attracts every other particle in the universe with a force which is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between their centers. This is a general physical law derived from empirical observations by what Isaac Newton called inductive reasoning. It is a part of classical mechanics and was formulated in Newton’s work Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (“the Principia”), first published on 5 July 1687. When Newton presented Book 1 of the unpublished text in April 1686 to the Royal Society, Robert Hooke made a claim that Newton had obtained the inverse square law from him.

In today’s language, the law states that every point mass attracts every other point mass by a force acting along the line intersecting the two points. The force is proportional to the product of the two masses, and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

Newton’s law has since been superseded by Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity, but it continues to be used as an excellent approximation of the effects of gravity in most applications. Relativity is required only when there is a need for extreme accuracy, or when dealing with very strong gravitational fields, such as those found near extremely massive and dense objects, or at very close distances (such as Mercury’s orbit around the Sun).

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Dr.-Ing.h.c. Schroeder spent ten years in various positions at Asea Brown Boveri (ABB), Mannheim, Germany. In 1979 he was named Professor and Chairman of the Institute of Electronics and Power Electronics at the University of Kaiserslautern. In 1983 he was named Professor and Chairman of the Institute of Electrical Drive, Systems at the Technical University of Munich, Germany. During 2006 -2009 retired but still in the old position, Since 2009 writing books and give lectures about Intelligent Strategies.
Industrial career: 1970-1976 Brown Boveri & Cie., Mannheim (now ABB); Research and Development Department, various areas of research and different positions 1976-1979 BBC, Mannheim, Head of the Technical Department of the Industrial Division

Academic career: 1979-1983 (interim until 1985) Technical University of Kaiserslautern, Chair and Director of the Institute for Electronics and Power Electronics 1983 – 2006 Technical University Munich,
Chair and Director of Electrical Drive Systems (Mechatronics)
2006 -2009 retired but still in the old position
2009 – now writing books and lecture Intelligent Strategies

Main areas of education: power electronic components, power electronic circuits, electrical drives, control of electrical drives, mechatronics, nonlinear control, simulation of drives and mechatronic systems, simulation tools
Main areas of research: physical modelling of power electronic components and circuits for CAE, high dynamic control of drives, design and development of a hybrid car [DFG research program 365 “autark hybrid car”, Transferbereich 38, responsible for the modelling of all components, simulation, optimization of the rating of the component, optimization of the driving strategy (of- and on-line), control of the car, electrical drive train]; combustion engine control, HIL- test stand for automotive components; nonlinear control strategies for the identification, modelling and control, web handling (paper, printing, seal, foil)

Honours: Honour PhD given from the Moscow Power Engineering Institute in Moscow, 1993,
Fellow IEEE, 2002

Editorial activities: Four books “Electrical Drives 1 – 4″, Springer
Fundamentals 1994 and 2002 (640 pages), 2007 ( 736 pages ), 2009 ( 742 pages )
Control 1995, 2001 (1240 pages) and 2006, 2008 ( 1336 pages, new edition 2012
Power Electronic Components 1996 and 2005 (1001 pages)
Power Electronic Circuits 1998 und 2006 , 2012 new edition
Gear Motor Handbook, Springer; Intelligent Identification and Control for Nonlinear Systems, Springer 2000
Intelligente Verfahren – Identifikation und Regelung nichtlinearer Systeme, Springer Verlag . 2009 (840 pages )
Currently more than 370 publications on conferences and technical papers.
Stephen Hawking predicted a race of superhumans will take over the world.

Physicist Michio Kaku on exploring the universe via avatars, in Mysteries of the Mind and What about telekinesis? said: Stan Lee a comic-book creator who co-launched superheroes like the Fantastic Four, Spider-Man, Doctor Strange and the X-Men for Marvel Comics

Prof. dr. Dierk Schroeder wrote in his book ” Intelligent Identification and Control for Nonlinear Systems ” that:

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Creative Genius who changed the world.

Superhuman Charles Darwin Galileo Galilei Isaac Newton Johannes Kepler Albert Einstein Stephen Hawking and Michio Kaku

Galileo Galilei an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer, sometimes described as a polymath. Galileo has been called the father of observational astronomy, the father of modern physics, the father of the scientific method and the father of modern science.

Johannes Kepler a German astronomer, mathematician, and astrologer. He is a key figure in the 17th-century scientific revolution, best known for his laws of planetary motion, and his books Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome Astronomiae Copernicanae. These works also provided one of the foundations for Newton’s theory of universal gravitation.

Isaac Newton an English mathematician, physicist, astronomer, theologian, and author (described in his own day as a “natural philosopher”) who is widely recognized as one of the most influential scientists of all time, and a key figure in the scientific revolution. His book Philosophy Naturalis Principia Mathematica (“Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy”), first published in 1687, laid the foundations of classical mechanics. Newton also made seminal contributions to optics, and shares credit with Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz for developing the infinitesimal calculus. In Principia, Newton formulated the laws of motion and universal gravitation that formed the dominant scientific viewpoint until it was superseded by the theory of relativity. Newton used his mathematical description of gravity to prove Kepler’s laws of planetary motion, account for tides, the trajectories of comets, the precession of the equinoxes and other phenomena, eradicating doubt about the Solar System’s heliocentricity. He demonstrated that the motion of objects on Earth and celestial bodies could be accounted for by the same principles. Newton’s inference that the Earth is an oblate spheroid was later confirmed by the geodetic measurements of Maupertuis, La Cond amine, and others, convincing most European scientists of the superiority of Newtonian mechanics over earlier systems.

Charles Darwin an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. His proposition that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors is now widely accepted, and considered a foundational concept in science. In a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, he introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding. Darwin published his theory of evolution with compelling evidence in his 1859 book On the Origin of Species, overcoming scientific rejection of earlier concepts of transmutation of species. By the 1870s, the scientific community and a majority of the educated public had accepted evolution as a fact. However, many favoured competing explanations and it was not until the emergence of the modern evolutionary synthesis from the 1930s to the 1950s that a broad consensus developed in which natural selection was the basic mechanism of evolution. Darwin’s scientific discovery is the unifying theory of the life sciences, explaining the diversity of life.

Albert Einstein a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed “the world’s most famous equation”. He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect, a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.

Stephen Hawking an English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and author who was director of research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology at the University of Cambridge at the time of his death. He was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009. His scientific works included a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularity theorems in the framework of general relativity and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set out a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He was a vigorous supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. Hawking achieved commercial success with several works of popular science in which he discusses his own theories and cosmology in general. His book A Brief History of Time appeared on the British Sunday Times best-seller list for a record-breaking 237 weeks. Hawking was a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. In 2002, Hawking was ranked number 25 in the BBC’s poll of the 100 Greatest Britons.

Bring me the brain of Albert Einstein.

Albert Einstein brain Superhuman Magnetic Man Mind Force Stan Lee Marvel

Bring me the brain of Albert Einstein.

Albert Einstein, the Nobel prize-winning physicist who gave the world the theory of relativity, E = mc2 and the law of the photoelectric effect, obviously had a special brain.

In what ways might Einstein’s brain biology have been different from average?

Scientists who have examined his brain have concluded that it is not normal. While Einstein’s brain weighs less than the brain of an average adult male, 2.7lbs versus 3 lbs, the inferior parietal region of the brain is 15% larger than in an average brain.

Albert Einstein was a genius, but he wasn’t the only one – why has his name come to mean something superhuman …… ?.

Scientific description of force field still missing.

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Scientific description of force field still missing.
The Force of Gravity , PK, Psychokinesis , Telekinesis , stick , sticky , Anomaly , First Scientific Concept , Unknown , Scientific Approach , Description of Force Field , Gravity , Discovery Science , Mathematical Model , Physical Science , Albert Einstein , The Theory of Relativity , Space and Time , Magnetic Man , Quantum Consciousness , Mental Evolution and Development , Mental Picture , Research into Human Consciousness ,

 

Inside and Outside, Perceptions of Duality. René Descartes Immanuel Kant and Albert Einstein. A short history,

René Descartes Immanuel Kant Albert Einstein

René Descartes the famous French philosopher and mathematician was born 31 March 1596 is known as the father of analytic geometry who discovered infinitesimal calculus and was a key figure in the scientific revolution, a true genius, he also experimented with human emotions and the concept of duality. Coincidentally he was stationed in 1619 in Neuburg an der Donau the very same location of the refugee camp where I was incarcerated in 1987- 89 and where I did my “out of body” and “altered consciousness” experiments. While he was there he carried out many experiments and actually created the background and much of the work that contributed to his well-known book “Meditations on First Philosophy”.

Many readers will be familiar with René Descartes is because of his famous quotation “Cogito ergo sum” – ” I think therefore I am”.

I will only refer to a very small portion of this man’s prodigious work, that part which has some bearing on the subject of this book and that is his studies and theories regarding “body and soul” known as Cartesian Dualism” which are covered in detail in two of his published works “Passions of the Soul” and “The Description of the Human Body”.

Previous to Cartesian Theories any interaction between mind or soul to the body was perceived to be only a one-way relationship that is the mind influences the body and not the reverse.

Descartes is proposed the following:

MIND ( SOUL ) >–< BODY

During the next century the famous German philosopher Immanuel Kant who

wrote “Critique of Pure Reason” proposed the controversial idea that human thoughts should not be influenced by external forces for example by the monarchy or the church. He believed there can be “existences or entities” beyond human sensory perception impossible to scientifically prove or disprove but he believed they can exist.

Kant attempted to blend together reason and experience in order to progress beyond the limitations of traditional philosophy and metaphysics.

He stated:

“It always remains a scandal of philosophy and universal human reason that the existence of things outside us … should have to be assumed merely on faith, and that if it occurs to anyone to doubt it, we should be unable to answer him with a satisfactory proof”

As well the well-known scientist Albert Einstein said:

“A human being is part of the whole called by us universe, a part limited in time and space. We experience ourselves, our thoughts and feelings as something separate from the rest. A kind of optical delusion of consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from the prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. The true value of a human being is determined by the measure and the sense in which they have obtained liberation from the self. We shall require a substantially new manner of thinking if humanity is to survive.”

With regard to my particular gifts, there are no contemporary scientific theories reasons etc. that can explain how I do what I am able to do nevertheless I am able to do it and I can do it repeatedly because there are no theories and there is no known mechanism does that mean it is impossible to do? Obviously not “the proof indeed is in the pudding”

My idea of what or who human beings are is the following, we’re like a small part of a watch, say a second hand cog wheel turning around inside a whole complex of parts. We possess not a comprehensive view, but a myopic one in that all we realize is we are moving around and around and we don’t have any idea that we are only a very very small part of the whole watch, we don’t see the watch it all!.