Munich International Film festival – Ralph Fiennes – Antonio Banderas – Mads Bügger – Bong Joon-ho 봉준호

Munich International Film festival - Ralph Fiennes - Antonio Banderas in Germany

Munich International Film festival – Ralph Fiennes – Antonio Banderas – Mads Bügger – Bong Joon-ho 봉준호

Munich International Film festival (German: Filmfest München) is the largest summer film festival in Germany and second only in size and importance to the Berlinale. It has been held annually since 1983 and takes place in late June. It presents feature films and feature-length documentaries. The festival is also proud of the role it plays in discovering talented and innovative young filmmakers. With the exception of retrospectives, tributes and homages, all of the films screened are German premieres and many are European and world premieres.

With over 200 feature films and feature-length documentaries on more than 18 screens, Filmfest München attracts approximately 80 000 movie lovers each year. It accredits more than 600 members of the international press and media as well as over 2500 film industry professionals. It has always been a popular meeting place for industry insiders throughout Germany and Europe. The festival center is located at Munich’s cultural center Gasteig, where screenings, panels, ceremonies and discussions take place and the festival offices are located. There are several participating movie theaters in the downtown area.

The director of Filmfest München is Diana Iljine, who took over in August 2011. Former directors are Andreas Ströhl (2004-2011) and Eberhard Hauff, who ran the festival from its outset. The festival is hosted by Internationale Münchner Filmwochen GmbH, whose shareholders are the City of Munich, the Free State of Bavaria (President of Bavaria Markus Söder), the Bayerischer Rundfunk (Bavarian Broadcasting, represented by director Ulrich Wilhelm) and the SPIO (the German film industry association represented by Thomas Negele. The IMF also hosts the annual International Festival of Film Schools (German: Internationales Festival der Filmhochschulen München) Filmschoolfest in November.

This year, two Hollywood stars received the CineMerit Award:

The Briton Ralph Fiennes presented in Munich his third directorial work “Nurejew – The White Crow”, in which he also plays the main role of the ballet master Alexander Pushkin.

The Spanish actor Antonio Banderas at the Munich Film Festival, he presented the new film directed by Pedro Almodóvar “suffering and glory,” for whose main role Banderas was just awarded at the Cannes Film Festival with the prestigious Actor Award.

Bong Joon-ho (Korean: 봉준호, is a South Korean film director and screenwriter whose films include the crime drama Memories Of Murder (2003), the monster movie The Host (2006) and the sci-fi action film Snowpiercer (2013), with the latter two being among the highest-grossing films of all time in South Korea. He has had two films in competition at the Cannes Film Festival: Okja, which debuted at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival, and Parasite, which won the Palme d’Or at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival. He became the first Korean director to win the award.

In 2017, Metacritic ranked Bong #13 on its list of the 25 best film directors of the 21st century. His films feature uncomfortable subject matter, black humor and sudden mood shifts.
His first two films, Danes for Bush and The Red Chapel, are ironic documentaries filmed in the United States and North Korea respectively.

Mads Brügger a Danish filmmaker and TV host in October 2011 released a new documentary, The Ambassador, about the trading of diplomatic titles in Africa. Brügger impersonated a Liberian ambassador by purchasing a new identity on a black market, and then proceeded to expose the ease with which people holding diplomatic titles can exploit the gem trade.

As result of the revelations in the documentary the government of Liberia has taken legal steps to prosecute Brügger and the other participants, due to the embarrassment his work has done to the country. However, as of July 2012 the Danish government has not been presented with a formal demand for the extradition of Brügger.

Brügger directed Cold Case Hammarskjöld (premiere at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival), which is a documentary film about the death of UN General Secretary Dag Hammarskjöld in a plane crash in 1961. In January 2019 Brügger reported in three articles in The Guardian about his findings.

Creative Genius who changed the world.

Superhuman Charles Darwin Galileo Galilei Isaac Newton Johannes Kepler Albert Einstein Stephen Hawking and Michio Kaku

Galileo Galilei an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer, sometimes described as a polymath. Galileo has been called the father of observational astronomy, the father of modern physics, the father of the scientific method and the father of modern science.

Johannes Kepler a German astronomer, mathematician, and astrologer. He is a key figure in the 17th-century scientific revolution, best known for his laws of planetary motion, and his books Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome Astronomiae Copernicanae. These works also provided one of the foundations for Newton’s theory of universal gravitation.

Isaac Newton an English mathematician, physicist, astronomer, theologian, and author (described in his own day as a “natural philosopher”) who is widely recognized as one of the most influential scientists of all time, and a key figure in the scientific revolution. His book Philosophy Naturalis Principia Mathematica (“Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy”), first published in 1687, laid the foundations of classical mechanics. Newton also made seminal contributions to optics, and shares credit with Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz for developing the infinitesimal calculus. In Principia, Newton formulated the laws of motion and universal gravitation that formed the dominant scientific viewpoint until it was superseded by the theory of relativity. Newton used his mathematical description of gravity to prove Kepler’s laws of planetary motion, account for tides, the trajectories of comets, the precession of the equinoxes and other phenomena, eradicating doubt about the Solar System’s heliocentricity. He demonstrated that the motion of objects on Earth and celestial bodies could be accounted for by the same principles. Newton’s inference that the Earth is an oblate spheroid was later confirmed by the geodetic measurements of Maupertuis, La Cond amine, and others, convincing most European scientists of the superiority of Newtonian mechanics over earlier systems.

Charles Darwin an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. His proposition that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors is now widely accepted, and considered a foundational concept in science. In a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, he introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding. Darwin published his theory of evolution with compelling evidence in his 1859 book On the Origin of Species, overcoming scientific rejection of earlier concepts of transmutation of species. By the 1870s, the scientific community and a majority of the educated public had accepted evolution as a fact. However, many favoured competing explanations and it was not until the emergence of the modern evolutionary synthesis from the 1930s to the 1950s that a broad consensus developed in which natural selection was the basic mechanism of evolution. Darwin’s scientific discovery is the unifying theory of the life sciences, explaining the diversity of life.

Albert Einstein a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed “the world’s most famous equation”. He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect, a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.

Stephen Hawking an English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and author who was director of research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology at the University of Cambridge at the time of his death. He was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009. His scientific works included a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularity theorems in the framework of general relativity and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set out a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He was a vigorous supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. Hawking achieved commercial success with several works of popular science in which he discusses his own theories and cosmology in general. His book A Brief History of Time appeared on the British Sunday Times best-seller list for a record-breaking 237 weeks. Hawking was a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. In 2002, Hawking was ranked number 25 in the BBC’s poll of the 100 Greatest Britons.